Tuesday, January 30, 2018

 

 

The model of care being provided at the Rosalie Unit in Castlerea is not in keeping with A Vision for Change, the plan for mental health services, according to the HSE’s head of community care. Speaking to the Roscommon Herald on Monday, Tony Canavan said neither he nor Minister Jim Daly gave a commitment on the long-term future of the unit at a meeting last week.

“If you were to summarise it, this is part of A Vision for Change, part of trying to modernise mental health services in Roscommon overall. The model of care has moved on and is certainly much more in keeping with A Vision for Change. And retaining a unit like the Rosalie Unit into the long-term future wouldn’t make sense in that context.”

The unit at Áras Naomh Chaolain has 14 patients with a range of dementia issues. There were threats to the facility in 2015 but after a public campaign assurances were given it would remain open. However, the unit ceased taking admissions last year and now a new question mark hangs over its future. Plans are afoot in Castlerea for a public meeting next week in protest at the threats.

Mr Canavan told the Roscommon Herald that from his “perspective and my assessment, the requirement for that kind of care isn’t there. Putting people into that setting is not good care. That’s why the numbers of people in the unit have been reducing over the last number of years. People with dementia or with psychiatry of later life requirements are receiving that care in other more appropriate settings.” He added that he would be meeting with families soon and was sensitive to the residents’ views.

Castlerea GP Greg Kelly told the Herald there appeared to be “a serious lack of vision” on behalf of the HSE. With over 2,000 Alzheimer sufferers in the county, Dr. Kelly said it made no sense to close the unit and transfer patients to private nursing homes or to facilities in Ballinasloe and Castlebar. He said it would take a political decision to prevent the closure of the unit and called on all political representatives to wake up to the threat of closure before it was too late. Dr. Kelly insisted the latest move by the HSE was part of a planned approach to the downgrading of health services in the county and pointed to the weekend closure of beds at Roscommon University Hospital as evidence of a lack of a commitment to making any meaningful attempt to provide a comprehensive health service in the county.

ure of the unit at a meeting last week.

“If you were to summarise it, this is part of A Vision for Change, part of trying to modernise mental health services in Roscommon overall. The model of care has moved on and is certainly much more in keeping with A Vision for Change. And retaining a unit like the Rosalie Unit into the long-term future wouldn’t make sense in that context.”

The unit at Áras Naomh Chaolain has 14 patients with a range of dementia issues. There were threats to the facility in 2015 but after a public campaign assurances were given it would remain open. However, the unit ceased taking admissions last year and now a new question mark hangs over its future. Plans are afoot in Castlerea for a public meeting next week in protest at the threats.

Mr Canavan told the Roscommon Herald that from his “perspective and my assessment, the requirement for that kind of care isn’t there. Putting people into that setting is not good care. That’s why the numbers of people in the unit have been reducing over the last number of years. People with dementia or with psychiatry of later life requirements are receiving that care in other more appropriate settings.” He added that he would be meeting with families soon and was sensitive to the residents’ views.

Castlerea GP Greg Kelly told the Herald there appeared to be “a serious lack of vision” on behalf of the HSE. With over 2,000 Alzheimer sufferers in the county, Dr. Kelly said it made no sense to close the unit and transfer patients to private nursing homes or to facilities in Ballinasloe and Castlebar. He said it would take a political decision to prevent the closure of the unit and called on all political representatives to wake up to the threat of closure before it was too late. Dr. Kelly insisted the latest move by the HSE was part of a planned approach to the downgrading of health services in the county and pointed to the weekend closure of beds at Roscommon University Hospital as evidence of a lack of a commitment to making any meaningful attempt to provide a comprehensive health service in the county.

 

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